With the coming of the Pentecost angels we have as Christians a wonderful invitation to renew our faith and become intimate with Jesus.

Jesus lived two millennia ago and half a world away in a culture very alien to me.  So I am intrigued by the prospect of “knowing” Jesus in a transformative way, overcoming all these barriers.  I grew up in Sunday school classes with felt cutouts of Jesus the shepherd, and now I have on my desk before me a beautiful carving from Palestine olive wood of the same shepherd with a lamb cast across his shoulders.

I’ve come a long way since my Sunday school days.  But the challenge now is to know the mind of Christ, to take into my heart the teachings of this Christ.

Some of you remember that old Gospel song, “I come to the garden alone, while the dew is still on the roses…”  This is where Jesus “walks with me, and he talks with me, and he tells me I am his own…”  Don’t many of us yearn for that kind of intimacy with our Saviour?  I know I do.

The meaning of Pentecost for me is the opportunity and the challenge of this degree of intimacy with Jesus.  He makes his Spirit available to us, not just to give us guidance from on high, but to commune with us at a deeper level, a personal level—the indwelling Spirit.

How any of our lives would be uplifted if we could experience this indwelling of the Spirit of Christ on a daily basis?  I believe this intimacy is ours for the asking this Pentecost Sunday, and this is the true meaning of our celebration.

How do we ask for and achieve this “walking and talking” relationship?

I believe this possibility exists if we just maintain a consciousness about it.  Begin your day with the Jesus prayer:  “Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner.”   I have this prayer pasted on my bathroom mirror.  At least I have the beginning opportunity to start my day with an awareness of his presence.

And if I practice this prayer throughout the day, I deepen my communion with my
Saviour.  Jesus can become a living presence in your life, and you can celebrate Pentecost all year ‘round.

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